Blog

The Ugly Truth About Training Zones

Exercise physiology textbooks generally devote several chapters to the three energy systems that power muscle contractions and how the three systems interact to support various intensities and durations of exercise. They tell us that adenosine tri-phosphate or ATP is the carrier that finally delivers energy for muscle contractions no matter what the source of that energy may be.

Athlete Perspective – Brianna Walle of Team Optum at the Ladies Tour of Qatar

The 2015 season officially started for me on February 3rd with a BANG, racing the international Ladies Tour of Qatar, a stage race with four road races in one of the windiest places to race on earth…and oh yeah, there’s sand and heat, too.  The race has been known to have sandstorms and nasty metal(ish) divider thingies that separate the road and contribute to nasty crashes.

Tips for Relieving Sore Hands on the Bicycle

Learning to Ride without Hand Pain
It’s not unusual for a cyclist to experience sore hands from time to time. It may be the muscles of the palm, the complex and delicate bones of the wrist, or the nerves and ligaments of the fingers that are affected. If the bike-fit is poor, and too much of the rider’s weight is on the bars, then discomfort will result*.

Good Sportsmanship and the Meaning of Competition: Why Following the Rules Matters

Riders and teams enter bike races because they want to see how they stack up against the competition. For that to make sense, riders must believe that the playing field is level. The competition must be fair to be meaningful. Sports only make sense if the best athletes win.

So You Want to Become a Cycling Coach

For more than 15 years, my colleagues and I have been hiring and training cycling and other coaches and then watching them develop. In that time we’ve had a chance to see what makes for a successful coach and what has held others back. Many factors contribute, including experience, education, and teaching skills.

Slow and Sweet and the Strava Files: Two great articles by David Darlington

David Darlington is author of several books and numerous articles, including several published in Bicycling Magazine. He’s also a long time bike rider who likes to go fast. Check out his story about the time his knee forced him to slow down and how that lead him to rediscover his love of cycling.

Hey Kid! Wanna Get Lucky? – Defending Against Misfortune in Bike Racing

This article has been updated from an article previously published in ROAD Magazine.
Coaches often say that racing success requires genetic talent, hard work and luck. You get the talent from your parents and there’s not much you can do about it. You put in the hard work. You hope for the luck.

I Guess You Had to Be There: What you need to know about bike racing but can’t learn from a book

Riders take certain things for granted. We believe the bike will go where we steer it, that we’ll pedal harder when we want to go faster and if we pedal hard enough, we’ll be able to catch the group or breakaway.

We don’t expect back soreness, while we do expect that we’ll pedal a little easier to clear leg pain when it shows up.

How to Train for Your First XTERRA Triathlon

Ever thought of riding a triathlon on a mountain bike or running a rocky trail instead of pounding pavement? When I tell people I’ve raced triathlons for the past 10 years, many of them imagine the Hawaiian Ironman and an inspirational TV broadcast.

Coach Toolbox: When an Athlete Reaches a Performance Plateau

Wenzel Coaching works to help our athletes and coaches find the best resources for their overall fitness and competitive games, no matter their level. This month we feature mental skills expert and therapist Melinda Halpern of Grit Performance as she talks about helping athletes through performance plateaus.